Neilpryde RS:Racing Evo 8 – Speed in another league?

New year, new sail…

Neilpryde Evo Speed
Neilpryde Evo Speed

Yes I have bought a Neilpryde RS:Racing Evo 8 sail in 5,6m. Why? Well I want to find out which is fastest sail for speedsurfing. So far I have been On Severne’s Reflex sails for the last two years and I have been quite content  with them. So what are my findings on the EVO sail?

They are fast… really fast…

What I have noticed immediately on the beach was that the sail is a lot deeper in the lower part then what I am used to. Even when adding some extra downhaul, the leech becomes very open, but the bottom part of the sail remains very deep. Everything on the sail is designed for maximum efficiency, the leeside looks very aerodynamic because of the streamlined monofoil battenpockets etc… The sail is overall very light for a full-on race sail, but I wouldn’t say that the monofilm is dangerously thin. The only complaint I have quality wise, is that the cambers are damaging the sail a bit…

How do all these things translate onto the water? The sail feels very powerful, meaning even in light winds the sail gives a lot of foreward momentum. In lower winds I was a lot faster with this sail compared to my Severne Reflex sail. As a result of this I could probably choose one size smaller then what I am used to, which is a positive thing, as the smaller sail is usually the faster sail. I sailed the 5,6m sail in La Franqui for two days and I noticed that when the wind was over 35 knots, starting to touch 40, I could not sail efficiently any more, as the sail had to much power. In that situation I could have gone with the 5,2…

The Neilpryde Speed sails have won almost everything there is to win in speedwindsurfing, holding the WSSRC world record and multiple records on the GPSS. For me the sail resulted in a Personal record on the speed track with a 5×10 sec average speed of 41,68 knots and a max speed of 44,8 knots. However, with 83kgs, I don’t think the 5,6 is the record sail for me, as it just delivers to much power in record conditions (exceeding 40 knots).

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